OPEN HOUSE & EXTENDED HOURS THIS FRI–SUN | 22–24 FEB

We will be having an Open House on the closing weekend of LIGHT TO NIGHT FESTIVAL: TRACES AND ECHOES. Enjoy FREE ADMISSION to all exhibitions including MINIMALISM: SPACE. LIGHT. OBJECT. There will also be extended hours to all exhibition galleries including concourse galleries on Fri & Sat from 10am–10pm. Come experience the festival before it closes! Click here to learn more

On display from 9 Jun 2018–6 Jan 2019

Outside Keppel Centre for Art Education, City Hall Wing, Level 1


IF COLOURS COULD MAKE SOUNDS, WHAT WOULD A RAINBOW SOUND LIKE?

Music is important to Lee Wen and he often uses it in his art. Rainbow Concert Hall is inspired by his painting Yellow Man, where are you Going? Lee Wen created this painting in 1990 just before leaving Singapore for London, where he participated in a sculpture symposium and stayed on to study art and design. It represents his departure from his hometown to his arrival in London to begin a new artistic journey.

The Rainbow Concert Hall may get noisy when there are more little musicians around. If you prefer quieter spaces, ask our friendly Gallery Ambassadors where to go.

FOR THE KIDS

  • Use the everyday objects around you to create different rhythms and tones.
  • Many of these objects can be found in your home too! What other household items could you use to create music in the Rainbow Concert Hall?

For more fun activities, purchase an Art Pack from one of the Children's Festival vending machines around the Gallery.

CREDIT LINE

Lee Wen. Rainbow Concert Hall. Singapore. 2018. Ribbons, cooking pots and pans, bottles, ladles, chopsticks, bells, sheet pans, badminton rackets and metal basins. Created in collaboration with National Gallery Singapore. Commissioned for Children's Festival: Small Big Dreamers 2018.


Related artwork
Related artwork

The Metal Basin

Lee Wen used a metal basin in his 1997 performance Journey of a Yellow Man No. 11: Multi-Culturalism. He painted himself yellow and started the performance by telling the audience about an exhibition that featured too many artworks made with ink and watercolour. He then climbed into a basin of water to wash the yellow paint off his body. Later, he poured the yellow bath water into bottles and offered them to the audience, saying “Now I am a watercolourist too!”

Tap the metal basin with different objects. What sounds do you hear? Are they similar?

View this work in Siapa Nama Kamu? Art in Singapore Since the 19th Century at DBS Singapore Gallery 3, Level 2, City Hall Wing.

Lee Wen. Journey of A Yellow Man No. 11: Multi-Culturalism. 1997. Inkjet print on archival paper. 101.6 x 144.8 cm. Collection of National Gallery Singapore

Installation Views